A look back at September 2018 on Isola Maggiore

This year’s retreat on the island was filled with sunny days, rich autumn colour and lots of laughter.  We welcomed writers from the USA, Canada, the UK and Australia. Most arrived with no particular plans about what they might write.  Seven days and four workshops later, everyone’s notebook or tablet was bursting with words and full of ideas.

There was the island’s mouth-watering food (and the tightening of waistbands!)  and the irresistible ‘sunset hour’ … simply sitting with an Aperol Spritz and watching the sky slowly spreading its pinks and yellows above the distant hills.

Once again, the island was working its magic.

My week on Isola Maggiore was restorative and enhancing in ways I didn’t expect.  I made huge strides with my novel; I made seven new friends; and I fell in love with a new corner of Italy.  I commend the writing retreat for anyone, regardless of where you are on the creative road or what genre you write.

Go.  Have an Aperol spritz.  Have two (they are quite strong, maybe stop at two).  Admire the pheasants.  Laugh.  Tell stories.

– Cheryl

Why Isola Maggiore?

It’s a long story – involving a monastery, seafood risotto, and a fair amount of serendipity – but I first discovered Isola Maggiore a couple of years ago … and as soon as I set foot on it, I was hooked.  This little bit of heaven had been waiting for me all along.

Life that year had been like one of those snow globes. You know the feeling? Everything swirling around, so that you can’t see anything clearly.  But on Isola Maggiore, all that mad fluttering magically settled. I’d  only gone across for an afternoon visit, but in the first hour I knew it was a very special place. I kicked off my sandals and swished my feet in the lake, making my own Trevi type promise:  “If I dip my toes in here,” I told myself, “I’ll be back.”

Trevi

Here and there – in the ice cream shop, the hilltop church, the lace museum – I saw small cards, advertising a photography blog, run by a Belgian man who’d retired to the island 20 yrs ago.  While I was drinking a Peroni overlooking the lake,  turning one of these little cards over and over in my hand, I had a ‘lightbulb moment’. I emailed the photographer from my phone. I’d fallen in love with the island, I told him, and just knew I had to write there. Somehow.

The next day, I found myself on the ferry back across the lake, already feeling at home. During the next couple of hours – and involving generous amounts of caffe, olives and pistachios – I was introduced by my Belgian host to several of the island’s 17 residents, including Silvia, who owns the gelateria, and Mariapia, owner of the island’s only hotel, Da Sauro. Before I knew it, we had a plan … and the rest, as they say, is history.

When I’m wandering along the lake shore, heading to where St Francis slept on a rock, I always stop for a moment at my own little Trevi and smile. Never underestimate the power of those lightbulb moments … Sometimes they lead you back to a secret island.

Glynis