September 2017 Retreat

The dates for the next retreat are 9-16 September 2017.

That’s a whole week of indulgence on Isola Maggiore, with 7 nights bed, breakfast & evening meal at Da Sauro (the island’s only hotel), daily writing workshops, an aperitivo time Italian lesson and much more.

You can book your place on the September Retreat for £675!

To grab your place, email Glynis for a booking form, then return it with your deposit of £275.

Isola Maggiore via Rome

‘Where should I fly to?’ is probably what people ask most.  The answer is, you can take your pick … Pisa, Perugia or Rome.  Or you can go the whole way from the UK by train and indulge in a two day trip, taking in Zurich and crossing the Alps – but that’s a whole other answer!

My favourite way is Rome. It’s such a contrast, flying into Italy’s biggest airport, with all its throngs of travellers and then, by late afternoon, finding myself on Isola Maggiore – no traffic, nobody rushing, just peace.

Rome has two airports, but the one you need is Italy’s equivalent of Heathrow: Fiumicino. My flight from Yorkshire lands just before noon. From there, I take the non stop Leonardo Express from the airport into the city centre. There’s a cheaper train, but I’m always too buzzing with excitement to choose that one.

When the Express pulls into Roma Termini station, I head for a light lunch.  Like London King’s Cross, Termini station is big and bustling and has plenty of places to get a coffee, a panino and, of course, to people watch … I’m in Italy, joining in the national pastime! Then I head for the train that will take me north east to Lake Trasimeno.

One of the many things I love about Italian trains – apart from their low prices – is the fact that each service has its own number and usually leaves from the same platform each time.  I always remember to validate my ticket before I board though – there’s a fine if your ticket’s not stamped.

Isola - Jazz train

Within minutes of leaving Rome, the train’s soon plunging in and out of about half a dozen tunnels through the city’s famous hills. Then it’s time to just sit and watch the gorgeous landscape go by for a couple of hours. In May, the tracks are lined by mile after mile of poppies. By now, I’ve usually slipped my shoes off, and am sitting with a bottle of water in some kind of dream, smiling at washing hanging from balconies and the familiar creak of the train as it pulls into stations.

Gradually, deep wooded valleys give way to slopes of vines and the Umbrian hill towns, topped by churches. By the time we leave Magione, I almost have my nose pressed against the window, because I know that there’s a tunnel coming up. And on the other side of the tunnel, the lake.

Then I’m stepping down from the train at the shimmering little station of Passignano sul Lago. Just a few minutes walk round the corner is the ferry that will take me back across to Isola Maggiore. It’s around 4 o’clock by now, but who cares?  Soon my watch and phone will barely get a glance – all that constant clock watching will be left behind.

 

 

 

 

 

Prosecco, pasta and a different pace

Sometimes we take a punt on an adventure and it really pays off!

I was thinking about what sort of holiday I would like, when I saw the advert for Glynis’s writing retreat.  That’s it!  That’s just what I want to do.  My writing experience was limited to a rough draft of a short story and a few poems.  But there was something appealing about the adventure of finding my way by train and boat to an island in the middle of Italy and seeing whether I had any talent for writing.  Isola - Angela back

Glynis provided an encouraging, safe and fun place to explore writing potential.  Her short, playful exercises help stimulate creativity and there is a good balance between workshops, time to rest and do one’s own thing, with lovely treats mixed in.  These included an afternoon trip round the island in a boat and prosecco aperitifs one evening.

Mariapia, the hotel owner, is very welcoming and the dinners made by her mamma are gorgeous.  Even now I am salivating at the thought of Pasta Bolognese!  Together with a large glass of Merlot and good conversation, the evenings were a special way to end the day.

It was great to be away from the madding crowds and traffic and live life at a different pace for a while.

Thanks to Glynis and her capacity to critique in a constructive, kind and helpful way, I am now working on a second draft of my short story.

– Angela, May 2016

A look back at May

Michelangelo and Maurizio stand on the harbour with their fishing rods, waiting. The sun is just starting to dip and there’s that usual anticipation of a sky softly streaked with pink.  I’m back on Isola Maggiore for the May retreat.

Next afternoon, the writers begin to arrive, stepping off the ferry with rucksacks, cases and bags, ready to stop the clock for a week.  The days are filled with everything from writing to wandering, from reading to reflection.  There’s a lot of gazing at the lake and deep, deep sighs of contentment.

The morning workshops go organic – we span from Angela who’s new to writing to Joe who’s on a novel – and pages quickly fill with plots, people, bubbling ideas. At eleven, cappuccini and fresh croissants arrive, then off we go again.

On two evenings, Giulia comes over from Abruzzo, here to lead aperitivo time sessions in conversational Italian. We drink prosecco, laugh a lot, and head for dinner ready to practice the phrases we’ve just learned.

Isola - Libera.jpg

Dinner goes off piste. Mariapia waves the menu aside, offering us fish fresh from the lake, swirls of steaming pasta and – her Mamma’s speciality – delicious salsa di persico.  The spinaci is the best we’ve ever tasted – how does she do that? – and we can’t resist her tiramisu.

It’s a whole week of slowing right down, of taking time to savour food and new friendships, of exploring ways into writing and sharing words. For me, it’s the pleasure of knowing I’ve been of help, of hearing Angela say “I’m just so happy.”

What to expect

I wasn’t sure what to expect of the writing retreat initially.  You’re at home in the English winter and you discover there’s a retreat in Italy in September.  You’ve no holiday booked and you’ve put writing off for what seems forever. Then on the spur of the moment you just think ‘why not?’

So off I went, and in two hours I’m in Rome.  Hot, vibrant and bustling.  The excitement of travelling through Italy by train to the beautiful town of Arezzo for one night and then the next day a train and ferry to Isola Maggiore.

Time has stood still there and within hours I felt relaxed, but excited about the week to come.  How had Glynis discovered this tranquil island where the pace of life is like none I’ve ever known?

I wanted time to get back to my writing and this was the perfect solution.  Inspirational sessions led by Glynis and the added bonus of a wonderful camaraderie with the other writers.  Sharing ideas, experiences and I loved every minute.

Other highlights included the welcoming islanders, the little restaurants and discovering the island itself.  Either walking and enjoying the wonderful views, or heading off with my notebook and a head full of ideas that I needed to get down on paper.

I sat, undisturbed for hours, thinking and writing.  No interruptions whatsoever other than the noises of the island … The wind in the trees, birdsong and the sound of the water lapping on the small beach.

It wasn’t a real beach, just a rocky outcrop, but it was my beach.

I found the week to be more inspiring than I’d ever have imagined.  It was just what I needed to help me. My characters developed from being two names to being living breathing characters … all the things Glynis had said helped everything fall into place. It was a real moment of clarity. I couldn’t wait to see what my characters would do next.

I’ve never felt more relaxed and more creative and that’s in no small part due to Glynis’ support and encouragement.

Isola Maggiore is a secret hideaway that’s the perfect place to write, but also relax and make you think differently about a lot of things.

Would I go back?  I have to …

-Tony Dixon 2015 Retreat Participant

 

A lake full of poetry

Imagine sitting by the shore at dusk, just reflecting on Lake Trasimeno’s peace and beauty … Who could fail to be inspired by it?

When Vittoria Aganoor, an Italian poet with Armenian ancestry, arrived in nearby Monte del Lago in the late 1800s, she felt compelled to write about the majesty of the lake. In 1901, she married a well known local politician, Giudo Pompilj, who – thank goodness – saved Lake Trasimeno from drying up.

WP - gelateria jetty.jpg

Less than ten years later, with the couple now living in Perugia, Vittoria fell gravely ill and died. Giudo was heartbroken by her death and took his own life close to her grave. In the note he left behind, he asked to be buried next to Vittoria.

The heroine of this romantic but tragic love story is considered to be the best known 19th century poet in Italy, and you don’t have to look far to see why Lake Trasimeno inspired so much of her work.

Workshops – with the occasional pheasant

Sometimes, when I take the big iron key and turn it in the lock, I have to pinch myself … are we really allowed to use this amazing old building for our writing workshops? It feels like trespassing.

The Priest’s House – or Bishop’s House, depending on whose translation you hear – has been standing empty and cobwebby for many years now, with just a few pieces of furniture on the ground floor. But oh, what furniture: the long oak table that we sit at once lived in the local school, way back in the days when children were still taught on the island. Mariapia, owner of our hotel, remembers it well. She runs her hand along its surface, telling me how she did all her lessons sitting at this very table. Then she comes back to today and puts a big plate of pastries on it for our coffee break.

WP - workshop building at back

The narrow doors that open onto the garden are even more impressive, fastened in place with all manner of old locks and bolts. A long iron rod slots into two holes at either side of the doorway, and easing it out sends crumbs of plaster spilling to the floor. Then it’s time to push the doors open. Light floods in, sending the local pheasants scattering over the grass to the lake.

We’re so privileged to have somewhere this atmospheric all to ourselves. It’s all thanks to Isola del Libro, the local cultural organisation, keepers of the big iron key. They just love us being here, putting the house to such good use. They don’t even mind us picking the occasional handful of walnuts and bashing them open on the wall. Every time I turn that rusty key in the lock, it’s like the adventure begins all over again.